Skip to main content

Oscar Wilde: Art and Morality. A Defence of “The Picture of Dorian Gray”


Published October 17, 2010


LibriVox recording of Oscar Wilde: Art and Morality. A Defence of “The Picture of Dorian Gray”. Edited by Stuart Mason. Read by Martin Geeson.

“Who can help laughing when an ordinary journalist seriously proposes to limit the subject-matter at the disposal of the artist?”

“We are dominated by journalism.... Journalism governs for ever and ever.”

One of the nastiest of the British tabloids was founded a year too late to join in the moral panic generated to accompany Oscar Wilde’s court appearances in 1895. Yet there was no shortage of hypocritical journalists posing as moral arbiters to the nation, then as now.

This compendium work - skilfully assembled by the editor, Stuart Mason - ends with transcript of Wilde’s first appearance in the Old Bailey, when he was cross-examined on the alleged immorality of his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. The disastrous outcome of these trials provides an ironic conclusion to the earlier knockabout exchanges between Oscar and his reviewers. In these he is at his flamboyant best, revelling in the publicity he pretends to disdain. His brave performances in the dock did nothing, however, to save him from hard labour, the treadmill and complete physical and moral breakdown which the law found it necessary to inflict on him.

In contrast to the hacks and lawyers, two refreshingly open-minded Americans write perceptively about the novel, as does Walter Pater, the grand old man of Aestheticism.

This solo Librivox project complements a new dramatised reading of The Picture of Dorian Gray, currently in preparation, featuring the present reader as Narrator. (Introduction by Martin Geeson)

For further information, including links to online text, reader information, RSS feeds, CD cover or other formats (if available), please go to the LibriVox catalog page for this recording.

For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.org.

Download M4B (108MB)


Source Librivox recording of a public-domain text
Run time 3:55:59

Reviews

Reviewer: arosebyanyothername - - January 22, 2013
Subject: Don't listen to him!
Goodness, members of the public, never has a previous commenter been so wrong! I normally don't bother reviewing, but this really got my blood boiling! Mr Geeson is a professional and I feel HONORED to have had the pleasure to listen to this book!
Reviewer: PainfullyPoetic - - January 21, 2013
Subject: Hate the voice
Can't rate this book because I can't get past the first 5 minutes of the narrator speaking. What a douchbag.
DOWNLOAD OPTIONS
Uploaded by
librivoxbooks
on 10/17/2010
Views
12,856
Favorites
2
Reviews
2
PEOPLE ALSO FOUND
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by F. Anstey
7,053
0
1
( 1 reviews )
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Young's Literal Translation
2,865
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Louis Couperus
417
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by P. G. Wodehouse
7,001
0
1
( 1 reviews )
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Various
4,062
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Unknown
824
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by King James Version (KJV)
1,371
0
0
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by George Herbert
2,929
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text
The LibriVox Free Audiobook Collection
by Gottfried Keller
5,804
0
0
Source: Librivox recording of a public-domain text